Sophia University Institute of Comparative Culture

I’m very happy to say that I’ll be giving a talk at Sophia University in Tokyo next week, 15 June 2018. “Dual Legacies: MAVO, Manga, and the Avant-Garde in Interwar Japan” explores the role that the radical 1920s art movement MAVO played in the work of the two most influential mangaka of the 1930s, Yanase Masamu and Tagawa Suihô, both of whom were MAVO members.

The talk starts at 18:30 and is open to the public. Full details are on the ICC page. I hope to see you there!

Mechademia Kyoto + Comics Studies Society

The schedule for the Mechademia Kyoto conference this weekend is now online, so I can confirm that I’ll be speaking on Saturday, giving my 2015 talk “A Children’s Empire: The Prewar ‘Media Mix’ of the Kodansha Club Magazines” a shiny post-PhD update. Registration is still available, and you should totally attend if you’ll be around.

I also heard yesterday that I received an honorable mention for the Comics Studies Society‘s inaugural Chute Award for Best Graduate Presentation for my talk  “Something Postmodern Going On: The Queering of the Manga Sphere in the 1970s,” given at the UC Berkeley CJS Graduate Conference last year. (The announcement initially said the mention had been given to my phantom twin brother, Andrew Horbinski, but he’s not the one with the PhD.)

I’m very grateful for the recognition, and I was also pleased to see that my Belgian colleague Benoît Crucifix has won the CSS Article prize for his article  “Cut-up and Redrawn: Charles Burns’s Swipe Files.” Sadly I have a prior commitment and won’t be able to attend the inaugural CSS Conference in August, but I hope to do so in the future.

Sirens Studio 2018

Since there are apparently 15 tickets remaining, it seems like the time to mention that I’ll be one of the faculty members at this year’s Sirens Studio, the prequel event for the Sirens Conference. Join us in Beaver Creek, CO in October to take a deep dive into writing, reading, and career sessions with me and seven other distinguished session leaders.

My session is “Taking the Off-Ramp: Strategies and Practices for Changing Careers (Especially for Academics).” We’ll be talking about the increasingly common reality of changing careers and best practices for doing it.

PCA/ACA 2018

Belatedly, I’m happy to say that I’ll be chairing a session and giving a paper at the PCA/ACA Conference in Indianapolis tomorrow. As part of “Comics and Comic Arts VII,” I’ll be speaking on “What Does the God of Manga Want with Anime? Re-Evaluating Tezuka in Manga History.”

I hope to see you there!

Beyond Academia 2018

I’m very excited to say that I’ll be appearing at the Beyond Academia 2018 conference at the beginning of next month. Beyond Academia is an organization seeking to connect PhDs with career opportunities outside academia, and I’ve been a fan of their work for a while now. The conference includes keynotes, panels, and networking receptions.

Specifically, I’ll be appearing on the Media & Communication panel at 9:45am on Thursday, March 1st, and sticking around through the networking luncheon that same day. Registration is open now. I hope to see you there!

AHA 2018

I’m writing from the train on the way to Washington, DC, where I’ll be presenting on my research at the 2018 conference of the American Historical Association.

Specifically, I’m part of the Comics and History panel tomorrow afternoon, at 1:30pm in the Empire ballroom. My topic is “Don’t Fear the Gutter: Platforms, Formats, and Comics in Postwar and Postmodern Japan,” in which I speak about some of the conclusions I drew about the history of pop culture in my dissertation. I hope to see you there!

Sirens Conference 2017

On Wednesday I’ll be heading to Colorado for the 2017 Sirens Conference. I’m very pleased to be returning to Sirens, one of my favorite annual events. The theme this year, which is sold out, is Women Who Wield Magic.

I’ll be participating in two program items; the first is a panel, and the second is a roundtable discussion:

Becoming a Better Reader
Amy Tenbrink, Faye Bi, Andrea Horbinski
Edith Wharton once said, “When I first began to read, and then to write ghost-stories, I was conscious of a common medium between myself and my readers, of their meeting me halfway among the primeval shadows, and filling in the gaps in my narrative with sensations and divinations akin to my own.” This idea, that readers must meet authors halfway, implies that readers bear a certain amount of responsibility for the success or failure of their reading experience—and that, ultimately, reading itself may be a skill, something that a reader can improve with education, diligence, and practice. On this panel, four readers will discuss what it might mean to be a good reader and how one might become a better reader.

The Magical Girls of Anime and Manga
Andrea Horbinski
The anime and manga genre of magical girls has a rich history of girls wielding magical power with fashion, friendship, and heart. In this roundtable, we’ll review our favorite magical girls from famous to unfairly forgotten, and talk about why and how anime, manga, and magical girls work so well together.
 Justin Pava

Crunchyroll Expo

Despite some shenanigans, I’m looking forward to attending the inaugural Crunchyroll Expo in Santa Clara this weekend. You can find me and my frequent collaborator Alex Leavitt at the con on Saturday: starting at 10:45, we’ll be presenting a newly updated version of our panel “Anime in Academia: An Introduction to Anime and Manga Studies.”

I hope to see you there! You’ll know me by the Yuri on Ice ita bag.

Sirens 2017

First things first: I’m speaking on the early history of manga at the Crunchyroll Expo in Santa Clara later this month. I’ll post again when I have full schedule details; tickets are available now.

Second: I’m delighted to say that I’ll be bringing anime and manga content to the Sirens Conference in Vail, CO in October of this year with the roundtable “The Magical Girls of Anime and Manga.” From the description:

The anime and manga genre of magical girls has a rich history of girls wielding magical power with fashion, friendship, and heart. In this roundtable, we’ll review our favorite magical girls from famous to unfairly forgotten, and talk about why and how anime, manga, and magical girls work so well together.

Sirens is one of my favorite conferences–I’ve attended all but two years of its eight years so far–and while I’d love to invite you to attend, this year it is already sold out. Still, if the conference themes sound like you’d be interested, you should totally keep it on your list for the future.

Finally, I have posted the Sirens fanvid playlist I made for last year’s con.